Update a bunch more transformations.
authorMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Tue, 1 Sep 2009 20:18:25 +0000 (22:18 +0200)
committerMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Tue, 1 Sep 2009 20:18:25 +0000 (22:18 +0200)
This almost completes the transformation specifications.

Chapters/Normalization.tex

index 059ba43..6c9b434 100644 (file)
@@ -397,8 +397,8 @@ in
   M
 -----------------
 let
-  \vdots
-  \vdots
+  \vdots [b/a]
+  \vdots [b/a]
 in
   M[b/a]
 \stoptrans
@@ -435,20 +435,195 @@ in
 \stoptrans
 
 \subsection{Non-representable binding inlining}
-This transform inlines let bindings of a funtion type. TODO: This should
-be generelized to anything that is non representable at runtime, or
-something like that.
+This transform inlines let bindings that have a non-representable type. Since
+we can never generate a signal assignment for these bindings (we cannot
+declare a signal assignment with a non-representable type, for obvious
+reasons), we have no choice but to inline the binding to remove it.
+
+If the binding is non-representable because it is a lambda abstraction, it is
+likely that it will inlined into an application and β-reduction will remove
+the lambda abstraction and turn it into a representable expression at the
+inline site. The same holds for partial applications, which can be turned into
+full applications by inlining.
+
+Other cases of non-representable bindings we see in practice are primitive
+Haskell types. In most cases, these will not result in a valid normalized
+output, but then the input would have been invalid to start with. There is one
+exception to this: When a builtin function is applied to a non-representable
+expression, things might work out in some cases. For example, when you write a
+literal \hs{SizedInt} in Haskell, like \hs{1 :: SizedInt D8}, this results in
+the following core: \lam{fromInteger (smallInteger 10)}, where for example
+\lam{10 :: GHC.Prim.Int\#} and \lam{smallInteger 10 :: Integer} have
+non-representable types. TODO: This/these paragraph(s) should probably become a
+separate discussion somewhere else.
+
+\starttrans
+letnonrec a = E in M
+--------------------------    \lam{E} has a non-representable type.
+M[E/a]
+\stoptrans
+
+\starttrans
+letrec 
+  \vdots
+  a = E
+  \vdots
+in
+  M
+--------------------------    \lam{E} has a non-representable type.
+letrec
+  \vdots [E/a]
+  \vdots [E/a]
+in
+  M[E/a]
+\stoptrans
+
+\startbuffer[from]
+letrec
+  a = smallInteger 10
+  inc = λa -> add a 1
+  inc' = add 1
+  x = fromInteger a 
+in
+  inc (inc' x)
+\stopbuffer
+
+\startbuffer[to]
+letrec
+  x = fromInteger (smallInteger 10)
+in
+  (λa -> add a 1) (add 1 x)
+\stopbuffer
+
+\transexample{Let flattening}{from}{to}
+
+\subsection{Compiler generated top level binding inlining}
+TODO
 
 \subsection{Scrutinee simplification}
 This transform ensures that the scrutinee of a case expression is always
 a simple variable reference.
 
+\starttrans
+case E of
+  alts
+-----------------        \lam{E} is not a local variable reference
+let x = E in 
+  case E of
+    alts
+\stoptrans
+
+\startbuffer[from]
+case (foo a) of
+  True -> a
+  False -> b
+\stopbuffer
+
+\startbuffer[to]
+let x = foo a in
+  case x of
+    True -> a
+    False -> b
+\stopbuffer
+
+\transexample{Let flattening}{from}{to}
+
+
 \subsection{Case simplification}
+This transformation ensures that all case expressions become normal form. This
+means they will become one of:
+\startitemize
+\item An extractor case with a single alternative that picks a single field
+from a datatype, \eg \lam{case x of (a, b) -> a}.
+\item A selector case with multiple alternatives and only wild binders, that
+makes a choice between expressions based on the constructor of another
+expression, \eg \lam{case x of Low -> a; High -> b}.
+\stopitemize
+
+\starttrans
+case E of
+  C0 v0,0 ... v0,m -> E0
+  \vdots
+  Cn vn,0 ... vn,m -> En
+--------------------------------------------------- \forall i \forall j, 0 <= i <= n, 0 <= i < m (\lam{wi,j} is a wild (unused) binder)
+letnonrec
+  v0,0 = case x of C0 v0,0 .. v0,m -> v0,0
+  \vdots
+  v0,m = case x of C0 v0,0 .. v0,m -> v0,m
+  x0 = E0
+  \dots
+  vn,m = case x of Cn vn,0 .. vn,m -> vn,m
+  xn = En
+in
+  case E of
+    C0 w0,0 ... w0,m -> x0
+    \vdots
+    Cn wn,0 ... wn,m -> xn
+\stoptrans
+
+TODO: This transformation specified like this is complicated and misses
+conditions to prevent looping with itself. Perhaps we should split it here for
+discussion?
+
+\startbuffer[from]
+case a of
+  True -> add b 1
+  False -> add b 2
+\stopbuffer
+
+\startbuffer[to]
+letnonrec
+  x0 = add b 1
+  x1 = add b 2
+in
+  case a of
+    True -> x0
+    False -> x1
+\stopbuffer
+
+\transexample{Selector case simplification}{from}{to}
+
+\startbuffer[from]
+case a of
+  (,) b c -> add b c
+\stopbuffer
+\startbuffer[to]
+letnonrec
+  b = case a of (,) b c -> b
+  c = case a of (,) b c -> c
+  x0 = add b c
+in
+  case a of
+    (,) w0 w1 -> x0
+\stopbuffer
+
+\transexample{Extractor case simplification}{from}{to}
 
 \subsection{Case removal}
 This transform removes any case statements with a single alternative and
 only wild binders.
 
+These "useless" case statements are usually leftovers from case simplification
+on extractor case (see the previous example).
+
+\starttrans
+case x of
+  C v0 ... vm -> E
+----------------------     \lam{\forall i, 0 <= i <= m} (\lam{vi} does not occur free in E)
+E
+\stoptrans
+
+\startbuffer[from]
+case a of
+  (,) w0 w1 -> x0
+\stopbuffer
+
+\startbuffer[to]
+x0
+\stopbuffer
+
+\transexample{Case removal}{from}{to}
+
 \subsection{Argument simplification}
 The transforms in this section deal with simplifying application
 arguments into normal form. The goal here is to:
@@ -456,8 +631,9 @@ arguments into normal form. The goal here is to:
 \startitemize
  \item Make all arguments of user-defined functions (\eg, of which
  we have a function body) simple variable references of a runtime
- representable type.
- \item Make all arguments of builtin functions either:
+ representable type. This is needed, since these applications will be turned
+ into component instantiations.
+ \item Make all arguments of builtin functions one of:
    \startitemize
     \item A type argument.
     \item A dictionary argument.
@@ -485,8 +661,23 @@ divide them into two categories:
         VHDL. To remove them, we create a specialized version of the
         called function with these arguments filled in. This is done by
         the argument propagation transform.
+
+        Typically, these arguments are type and dictionary arguments that are
+        used to make functions polymorphic. By propagating these arguments, we
+        are essentially doing the same which GHC does when it specializes
+        functions: Creating multiple variants of the same function, one for
+        each type for which it is used. Other common non-representable
+        arguments are functions, e.g. when calling a higher order function
+        with another function or a lambda abstraction as an argument.
+
+        The reason for doing this is similar to the reasoning provided for
+        the inlining of non-representable let bindings above. In fact, this
+        argument propagation could be viewed as a form of cross-function
+        inlining.
 \stopitemize
 
+TODO: Check the following itemization.
+
 When looking at the arguments of a builtin function, we can divide them
 into categories: 
 
@@ -569,9 +760,10 @@ into categories:
         categories instead.
 \stopitemize
 
-\subsubsection{Argument extraction}
+\subsubsection{Argument simplification}
 This transform deals with arguments to functions that
-are of a runtime representable type. 
+are of a runtime representable type. It ensures that they will all become
+references to global variables, or local signals in the resulting VHDL. 
 
 TODO: It seems we can map an expression to a port, not only a signal.
 Perhaps this makes this transformation not needed?
@@ -584,16 +776,21 @@ a new let expression around the application, which binds the complex
 expression to a new variable. The original function is then applied to
 this variable.
 
-%\transform{Argument extract}
-%{
-%\lam{Y} is of a hardware representable type
-%
-%\lam{Y} is not a variable referene
-%
-%\conclusion
-%
-%\trans{X Y}{let z = Y in X z}
-%}
+\starttrans
+M N
+--------------------    \lam{N} is of a representable type
+let x = N in M x        \lam{N} is not a local variable reference
+\stoptrans
+
+\startbuffer[from]
+add (add a 1) 1
+\stopbuffer
+
+\startbuffer[to]
+let x = add a 1 in add x 1
+\stopbuffer
+
+\transexample{Argument extraction}{from}{to}
 
 \subsubsection{Function extraction}
 This transform deals with function-typed arguments to builtin functions.
@@ -605,24 +802,36 @@ parameters to the new global function. The original argument is replaced
 with a reference to the new function, applied to any free variables from
 the original argument.
 
-%\transform{Function extraction}
-%{
-%\lam{X} is a (partial application of) a builtin function
-%
-%\lam{Y} is not an application
-%
-%\lam{Y} is not a variable reference
-%
-%\conclusion
-%
-%\lam{f0 ... fm} = free local vars of \lam{Y}
-%
-%\lam{y} is a new global variable
-%
-%\lam{y = λf0 ... fn.Y}
-%
-%\trans{X Y}{X (y f0 ... fn)}
-%}
+This transformation is useful when applying higher order builtin functions
+like \hs{map} to a lambda abstraction, for example. In this case, the code
+that generates VHDL for \hs{map} only needs to handle top level functions and
+partial applications, not any other expression (such as lambda abstractions or
+even more complicated expressions).
+
+\starttrans
+M N                     \lam{M} is a (partial aplication of a) builtin function.
+---------------------   \lam{f0 ... fn} = free local variables of \lam{N}
+M x f0 ... fn           \lam{N :: a -> b}
+~                       \lam{N} is not a (partial application of) a top level function
+x = λf0 ... λfn.N
+\stoptrans
+
+\startbuffer[from]
+map (λa . add a b) xs
+
+map (add b) ys
+\stopbuffer
+
+\startbuffer[to]
+x0 = λb.λa.add a b
+~
+map x0 xs
+
+x1 = λb.add b
+map x1 ys
+\stopbuffer
+
+\transexample{Function extraction}{from}{to}
 
 \subsubsection{Argument propagation}
 This transform deals with arguments to user-defined functions that are
@@ -681,18 +890,65 @@ x = E
 ~
 x Y0 ... Yi ... Yn                               \lam{Yi} is not of a runtime representable type
 ---------------------------------------------    \lam{Yi} is not a local variable reference
-x' = λy0 ... yi-1 f0 ... fm yi+1 ... yn .        \lam{f0 ... fm} = free local vars of \lam{Y_i}
-      E y0 ... yi-1 Yi yi+1 ... yn   
+x' y0 ... yi-1 f0 ...  fm Yi+1 ... Yn            \lam{f0 ... fm} = free local vars of \lam{Yi}
 ~
-x' y0 ... yi-1 f0 ...  fm Yi+1 ... Yn
+x' = λy0 ... yi-1 f0 ... fm yi+1 ... yn .       
+      E y0 ... yi-1 Yi yi+1 ... yn   
+
 \stoptrans
 
+TODO: Example
+
 \subsection{Cast propagation / simplification}
-This transform pushes casts down into the expression as far as possible.
+This transform pushes casts down into the expression as far as possible. Since
+its exact role and need is not clear yet, this transformation is not yet
+specified.
 
 \subsection{Return value simplification}
+This transformation ensures that the return value of a function is always a
+simple local variable reference.
+
 Currently implemented using lambda simplification, let simplification, and
-top simplification. Should change.
+top simplification. Should change into something like the following, which
+works only on the result of a function instead of any subexpression. This is
+achieved by the contexts, like \lam{x = E}, though this is strictly not
+correct (you could read this as "if there is any function \lam{x} that binds
+\lam{E}, any \lam{E} can be transformed, while we only mean the \lam{E} that
+is bound by \lam{x}. This might need some extra notes or something).
+
+\starttrans
+x = E                            \lam{E} is representable
+~                                \lam{E} is not a lambda abstraction
+E                                \lam{E} is not a let expression
+---------------------------      \lam{E} is not a local variable reference
+let x = E in x
+\stoptrans
+
+\starttrans
+x = λv0 ... λvn.E
+~                                \lam{E} is representable
+E                                \lam{E} is not a let expression
+---------------------------      \lam{E} is not a local variable reference
+let x = E in x
+\stoptrans
+
+\starttrans
+x = λv0 ... λvn.let ... in E
+~                                \lam{E} is representable
+E                                \lam{E} is not a local variable reference
+---------------------------
+let x = E in x
+\stoptrans
+
+\startbuffer[from]
+x = add 1 2
+\stopbuffer
+
+\startbuffer[to]
+x = let x = add 1 2 in x
+\stopbuffer
+
+\transexample{Return value simplification}{from}{to}
 
 \subsection{Example sequence}