Solve and remove some todos.
authorMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Wed, 2 Dec 2009 14:51:30 +0000 (15:51 +0100)
committerMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Wed, 2 Dec 2009 14:51:30 +0000 (15:51 +0100)
Chapters/Normalization.tex

index 03f3792..f4156b6 100644 (file)
   core can describe expressions that do not have a direct hardware
   interpretation.
 
-  \todo{Describe core properties not supported in \VHDL, and describe how the
-  \VHDL we want to generate should look like.}
-
   \section{Normal form}
-    \todo{Refresh or refer to distinct hardware per application principle}
     The transformations described here have a well-defined goal: To bring the
     program in a well-defined form that is directly translatable to hardware,
     while fully preserving the semantics of the program. We refer to this form as
 
       In particular, we define no particular order of transformations. Since
       transformation order should not influence the resulting normal form,
-      \todo{This is not really true, but would like it to be...} this leaves
-      the implementation free to choose any application order that results in
-      an efficient implementation.
+      this leaves the implementation free to choose any application order that
+      results in an efficient implementation. Unfortunately this is not
+      entirely true for the current set of transformations. See
+      \in{section}[sec:normalization:non-determinism] for a discussion of this
+      problem.
 
       When applying a single transformation, we try to apply it to every (sub)expression
       in a function, not just the top level function body. This allows us to
         let y = (a * b) in y + y
         \stoplambda
 
-      \subsection{Non-determinism}
+      \subsection[sec:normalization:non-determinism]{Non-determinism}
         As an example, again consider the following expression:
 
         \startlambda