Move a sidenote.
authorMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Mon, 7 Dec 2009 14:25:27 +0000 (15:25 +0100)
committerMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Mon, 7 Dec 2009 14:25:27 +0000 (15:25 +0100)
Chapters/Normalization.tex

index fd62fea..a1dec0a 100644 (file)
     \in{section}[sec:normalization:transformation].
 
     \subsection{General cleanup}
-      These transformations are general cleanup transformations, that aim to
-      make expressions simpler. These transformations usually clean up the
-       mess left behind by other transformations or clean up expressions to
-       expose new transformation opportunities for other transformations.
-
-       Most of these transformations are standard optimizations in other
-       compilers as well. However, in our compiler, most of these are not just
-       optimizations, but they are required to get our program into intended
-       normal form.
-
-        \placeintermezzo{}{
-          \defref{substitution notation}
-          \startframedtext[width=8cm,background=box,frame=no]
-          \startalignment[center]
-            {\tfa Substitution notation}
-          \stopalignment
-          \blank[medium]
+      \placeintermezzo{}{
+        \defref{substitution notation}
+        \startframedtext[width=8cm,background=box,frame=no]
+        \startalignment[center]
+          {\tfa Substitution notation}
+        \stopalignment
+        \blank[medium]
+
+        In some of the transformations in this chapter, we need to perform
+        substitution on an expression. Substitution means replacing every
+        occurence of some expression (usually a variable reference) with
+        another expression.
+
+        There have been a lot of different notations used in literature for
+        specifying substitution. The notation that will be used in this report
+        is the following:
 
-          In some of the transformations in this chapter, we need to perform
-          substitution on an expression. Substitution means replacing every
-          occurence of some expression (usually a variable reference) with
-          another expression.
+        \startlambda
+          E[A=>B]
+        \stoplambda
 
-          There have been a lot of different notations used in literature for
-          specifying substitution. The notation that will be used in this report
-          is the following:
+        This means expression \lam{E} with all occurences of \lam{A} replaced
+        with \lam{B}.
+        \stopframedtext
+      }
 
-          \startlambda
-            E[A=>B]
-          \stoplambda
+      These transformations are general cleanup transformations, that aim to
+      make expressions simpler. These transformations usually clean up the
+      mess left behind by other transformations or clean up expressions to
+      expose new transformation opportunities for other transformations.
 
-          This means expression \lam{E} with all occurences of \lam{A} replaced
-          with \lam{B}.
-          \stopframedtext
-        }
+      Most of these transformations are standard optimizations in other
+      compilers as well. However, in our compiler, most of these are not just
+      optimizations, but they are required to get our program into intended
+      normal form.
 
       \subsubsection[sec:normalization:beta]{β-reduction}
         β-reduction is a well known transformation from lambda calculus, where it is