Add section on higher order functions.
authorMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Fri, 19 Feb 2010 10:30:32 +0000 (11:30 +0100)
committerMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Fri, 19 Feb 2010 10:30:32 +0000 (11:30 +0100)
cλash.lhs

index 5819c83..3cbf301 100644 (file)
@@ -810,6 +810,120 @@ data IntPair = IntPair Int Int
     of the builtin ones for its builtin functions (like \hs{Num} and
     \hs{Eq}).
 
+  \subsection{Higher order}
+    Another powerful abstraction mechanism in functional languages, is
+    the concept of \emph{higher order functions}, or \emph{functions as
+    a first class value}. This allows a function to be treated as a
+    value and be passed around, even as the argument of another
+    function. Let's clarify that with an example:
+    
+    \begin{code}
+    notList xs = map not xs
+    \end{code}
+
+    This defines a function \hs{notList}, with a single list of booleans
+    \hs{xs} as an argument, which simply negates all of the booleans in
+    the list. To do this, it uses the function \hs{map}, which takes
+    \emph{another function} as its first argument and applies that other
+    function to each element in the list, returning again a list of the
+    results.
+
+    As you can see, the \hs{map} function is a higher order function,
+    since it takes another function as an argument. Also note that
+    \hs{map} is again a polymorphic function: It does not pose any
+    constraints on the type of elements in the list passed, other than
+    that it must be the same as the type of the argument the passed
+    function accepts. The type of elements in the resulting list is of
+    course equal to the return type of the function passed (which need
+    not be the same as the type of elements in the input list). Both of
+    these can be readily seen from the type of \hs{map}:
+
+    \begin{code}
+    map :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b]
+    \end{code}
+    
+    As an example from a common hardware design, let's look at the
+    equation of a FIR filter.
+
+    \begin{equation}
+    y_t  = \sum\nolimits_{i = 0}^{n - 1} {x_{t - i}  \cdot h_i } 
+    \end{equation}
+
+    A FIR filter multiplies fixed constants ($h$) with the current and
+    a few previous input samples ($x$). Each of these multiplications
+    are summed, to produce the result at time $t$.
+
+    This is easily and directly implemented using higher order
+    functions. Consider that the vector \hs{hs} contains the FIR
+    coefficients and the vector \hs{xs} contains the current input sample
+    in front and older samples behind. How \hs{xs} gets its value will be
+    show in the next section about state.
+
+    \begin{code}
+    fir ... = foldl1 (+) (zipwith (*) xs hs)
+    \end{code}
+
+    Here, the \hs{zipwith} function is very similar to the \hs{map}
+    function: It takes a function two lists and then applies the
+    function to each of the elements of the two lists pairwise
+    (\emph{e.g.}, \hs{zipwith (+) [1, 2] [3, 4]} becomes 
+    \hs{[1 + 3, 2 + 4]}.
+
+    The \hs{foldl1} function takes a function and a single list and applies the
+    function to the first two elements of the list. It then applies to
+    function to the result of the first application and the next element
+    from the list. This continues until the end of the list is reached.
+    The result of the \hs{foldl1} function is the result of the last
+    application.
+
+    As you can see, the \hs{zipwith (*)} function is just pairwise
+    multiplication and the \hs{foldl1 (+)} function is just summation.
+
+    To make the correspondence between the code and the equation even
+    more obvious, we turn the list of input samples in the equation
+    around. So, instead of having the the input sample received at time
+    $t$ in $x_t$, $x_0$ now always stores the current sample, and $x_i$
+    stores the $ith$ previous sample. This changes the equation to the
+    following (Note that this is completely equivalent to the original
+    equation, just with a different definition of $x$ that better suits
+    the \hs{x} from the code):
+
+    \begin{equation}
+    y_t  = \sum\nolimits_{i = 0}^{n - 1} {x_i  \cdot h_i } 
+    \end{equation}
+
+    So far, only functions have been used as higher order values. In
+    Haskell, there are two more ways to obtain a function-typed value:
+    partial application and lambda abstraction. Partial application
+    means that a function that takes multiple arguments can be applied
+    to a single argument, and the result will again be a function (but
+    that takes one argument less). As an example, consider the following
+    expression, that adds one to every element of a vector:
+
+    \begin{code}
+    map ((+) 1) xs
+    \end{code}
+
+    Here, the expression \hs{(+) 1} is the partial application of the
+    plus operator to the value \hs{1}, which is again a function that
+    adds one to its argument.
+
+    A labmda expression allows one to introduce an anonymous function
+    in any expression. Consider the following expression, which again
+    adds one to every element of a list:
+
+    \begin{code}
+    map (\x -> x + 1) xs
+    \end{code}
+
+    Finally, higher order arguments are not limited to just builtin
+    functions, but any function defined in \CLaSH can have function
+    arguments. This allows the hardware designer to use a powerful
+    abstraction mechanism in his designs and have an optimal amount of
+    code reuse.
+
+    TODO: Describe ALU example (no code)
+
   \subsection{State}
     A very important concept in hardware it the concept of state. In a 
     stateful design, the outputs depend on the history of the inputs, or the