Some more fixed resulting from Jan's comments.
authorMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Mon, 7 Dec 2009 13:38:16 +0000 (14:38 +0100)
committerMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Mon, 7 Dec 2009 13:38:16 +0000 (14:38 +0100)
Chapters/Normalization.tex

index aa168e0..322b240 100644 (file)
           {\defref{intended normal form definition}
            \typebufferlam{IntendedNormal}}
 
-      When looking at such a program from a hardware perspective, the
-      top level lambda abstractions define the input ports. Lambda
-      abstractions cannot appear anywhere else. The variable reference
-      in the body of the recursive let expression is the output port.
-      Most function applications bound by the let expression define a
-      component instantiation, where the input and output ports are
-      mapped to local signals or arguments. Some of the others use a
-      built-in construction (\eg\ the \lam{case} expression) or call a
-      built-in function (\eg\ \lam{+} or \lam{map}). For these, a
-      hardcoded \small{VHDL} translation is available.
+      When looking at such a program from a hardware perspective, the top
+      level lambda abstractions (\italic{lambda}) define the input ports.
+      Lambda abstractions cannot appear anywhere else. The variable reference
+      in the body of the recursive let expression (\italic{toplet}) is the
+      output port.  Most binders bound by the let expression define a
+      component instantiation (\italic{userapp}), where the input and output
+      ports are mapped to local signals (\italic{userarg}). Some of the others
+      use a built-in construction (\eg\ the \lam{case} expression) or call a
+      built-in function (\italic{builtinapp}) such as \lam{+} or \lam{map}.
+      For these, a hardcoded \small{VHDL} translation is available.
 
   \section[sec:normalization:transformation]{Transformation notation}
     To be able to concisely present transformations, we use a specific format
       dictionaries, functions.
       \defref{representable}
 
-      A \emph{built-in function} is a function supplied by the Cλash framework, whose
-      implementation is not valid Cλash. The implementation is of course valid
-      Haskell, for simulation, but it is not expressable in Cλash.
-      \defref{built-in function} \defref{user-defined function}
+      A \emph{built-in function} is a function supplied by the Cλash
+      framework, whose implementation is not used to generate \VHDL. This is
+      either because it is no valid Cλash (like most list functions that need
+      recursion) or because a Cλash implementation would be unwanted (for the
+      addition operator, for example, we would rather use the \VHDL addition
+      operator to let the synthesis tool decide what kind of adder to use
+      instead of explicitly describing one in Cλash). \defref{built-in
+      function}
 
-      For these functions, Cλash has a \emph{built-in hardware translation}, so calls
-      to these functions can still be translated. These are functions like
-      \lam{map}, \lam{hwor} and \lam{length}.
+      These are functions like \lam{map}, \lam{hwor}, \lam{+} and \lam{length}.
 
-      A \emph{user-defined} function is a function for which we do have a Cλash
-      implementation available.
+      For these functions, Cλash has a \emph{built-in hardware translation},
+      so calls to these functions can still be translated.  Built-in functions
+      must have a valid Haskell implementation, of course, to allow
+      simulation. 
+
+      A \emph{user-defined} function is a function for which no built-in
+      translation is available and whose definition will thus need to be
+      translated to Cλash. \defref{user-defined function}
 
       \subsubsection[sec:normalization:predicates]{Predicates}
         Here, we define a number of predicates that can be used below to concisely
 
       \todo{Define β-reduction and η-reduction?}
 
-      Note that the normal form of such a system consists of the set of nodes
-      (expressions) without outgoing edges, since those are the expressions to which
-      no transformation applies anymore. We call this set of nodes the \emph{normal
-      set}. The set of nodes containing expressions in intended normal
-      form \refdef{intended normal form} is called the \emph{intended
-      normal set}.
+      In such a graph a node (expression) is in normal form if it has no
+      outgoing edges (meaning no transformation applies to it). The set of
+      nodes without outgoing edges is called the \emph{normal set}. Similarly,
+      the set of nodes containing expressions in intended normal form
+      \refdef{intended normal form} is called the \emph{intended normal set}.
 
       From such a graph, we can derive some properties easily:
       \startitemize[KR]