Prevent spaces after citations from being gobbled.
authorMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Mon, 7 Dec 2009 20:42:30 +0000 (21:42 +0100)
committerMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Mon, 7 Dec 2009 20:42:30 +0000 (21:42 +0100)
Chapters/Context.tex
Chapters/Future.tex
Chapters/Introduction.tex

index 7e620a0..7c256da 100644 (file)
   this not been done before?}. Using a functional language for describing hardware
   is not a new idea at all. In fact, there has been research into functional
   hardware description even before the conventional hardware description
-  languages were created. Examples of these are µFP \cite[sheeran83] and
+  languages were created. Examples of these are µFP \cite[sheeran83]\ and
   Ruby \cite[jones90]. Functional languages were not nearly as advanced
   as they are now, and functional hardware description never really got
   off. 
 
   Recently, there have been some renewed efforts, especially using the
-  Haskell functional language. Examples are Lava \cite[claessen00] (an
-  \small{EDSL}) and ForSyde \cite[sander04] (an \small{EDSL} using
-  Template Haskell). \cite[baaij09] has a more complete overview of the
+  Haskell functional language. Examples are Lava \cite[claessen00]\ (an
+  \small{EDSL}) and ForSyde \cite[sander04]\ (an \small{EDSL} using
+  Template Haskell). \cite[baaij09]\ has a more complete overview of the
   current field.
 
   We will now have a look at the existing hardware description languages,
@@ -80,7 +80,7 @@
     embedded functional hardware description languages (in particular
     those using Haskell) are limited. Below a number of downsides are
     sketched of the recent attempts using the Haskell language.
-    \cite[baaij09] has a more complete overview of these and other
+    \cite[baaij09]\ has a more complete overview of these and other
     languages.
     
     This list uses Lava and ForSyDe as examples, but tries to generalize
index d395586..9c7bb51 100644 (file)
@@ -587,7 +587,7 @@ higher-order value at the spot where it is applied, and thus the higher-order
 value disappears.
 
 This approach is commonly known as the \quote{Reynolds approach to
-defuntionalization}, first described by J.C. Reynolds \cite[reynolds98] and
+defuntionalization}, first described by J.C. Reynolds \cite[reynolds98]\ and
 seems to apply well to this situation. One note here is that Reynolds'
 approach puts all the higher-order values in a single datatype. For a typed
 language, we will at least have to have a single datatype for each function
index 1b24ace..e41de51 100644 (file)
@@ -7,10 +7,10 @@ connect these worlds and puts a step towards making hardware programming
 on the whole easier, more maintainable and generally more pleasant.
 
 This assignment has been performed in close cooperation with Christiaan
-Baaij, whose Master's thesis \cite[baaij09] has been completed at the
+Baaij, whose Master's thesis \cite[baaij09]\ has been completed at the
 same time as this thesis. Where this thesis focuses on the
 interpretation of the Haskell language and the compilation process,
-\cite[baaij09] has a more thorough study of the field, explores more
+\cite[baaij09]\ has a more thorough study of the field, explores more
 advanced types and provides a case study.
 
 % Use \subject to hide this section from the toc
@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ advanced types and provides a case study.
     \stopcombination
 
   Slightly more complicated is the incremental summation of
-  values show in \in{example}[ex:RecursiveSum]\note[notfinalsyntax].
+  values shown in \in{example}[ex:RecursiveSum]\note[notfinalsyntax].
 
   In this example we see a recursive function \hs{sum'} that recurses over a
   list and takes an accumulator argument that stores the sum so far. On each