Add a section on expressions in the Core language.
authorMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Thu, 15 Oct 2009 16:33:25 +0000 (18:33 +0200)
committerMatthijs Kooijman <matthijs@stdin.nl>
Thu, 15 Oct 2009 16:33:25 +0000 (18:33 +0200)
There should be another (sub)section on typing in the Core language.

Chapters/Prototype.tex

index 293e004..6ef6a97 100644 (file)
     constructs. This step is described in a lot of detail at
     \in{chapter}[chap:normalization].
     
+  \section{The Core language}
+    Most of the prototype deals with handling the program in the Core
+    language. In this section we will show what this language looks like and
+    how it works.
+
+    The Core language is a functional language that describes
+    \emph{expressions}. Every identifier used in Core is called a
+    \emph{binder}, since it is bound to a value somewhere. On the highest
+    level, a Core program is a collection of functions, each of which bind a
+    binder (the function name) to an expression (the function value, which has
+    a function type).
+
+    The Core language itself does not prescribe any program structure, only
+    expression structure. In the \small{GHC} compiler, the Haskell module
+    structure is used for the resulting Core code as well. Since this is not
+    so relevant for understanding the Core language or the Normalization
+    process, we'll only look at the Core expression language here.
+
+    Each Core expression consists of one of these possible expressions.
+
+    \startdesc{Variable reference}
+\startlambda
+a
+\stoplambda
+      This is a simple reference to a binder. It's written down as the
+      name of the binder that is being referred to, which should of course be
+      bound in a containing scope (including top level scope, so a reference
+      to a top level function is also a variable reference). Additionally,
+      constructors from algebraic datatypes also become variable references.
+
+      The value of this expression is the value bound to the given binder.
+
+      Each binder also carries around its type, but this is usually not shown
+      in the Core expressions. Occasionally, the type of an entire expression
+      or function is shown for clarity, but this is only informational. In
+      practice, the type of an expression is easily determined from the
+      structure of the expression and the types of the binders and occasional
+      cast expressions. This minimize the amount of bookkeeping needed to keep
+      the typing consistent.
+    \stopdesc
+    \startdesc{Literal}
+\startlambda
+10
+\stoplambda
+      This is a simple literal. Only primitive types are supported, like
+      chars, strings, ints and doubles. The types of these literals are the
+      \quote{primitive} versions, like \lam{Char\#} and \lam{Word\#}, not the
+      normal Haskell versions (but there are builtin conversion functions).
+    \stopdesc
+    \startdesc{Application}
+\startlambda
+func arg
+\stoplambda
+      This is simple function application. Each application consists of two
+      parts: The function part and the argument part. Applications are used
+      for normal function \quote{calls}, but also for applying type
+      abstractions and data constructors.
+      
+      The value of an application is the value of the function part, with the
+      first argument binder bound to the argument part.
+    \stopdesc
+    \startdesc{Lambda abstraction}
+\startlambda
+λbndr.body
+\stoplambda
+      This is the basic lambda abstraction, as it occurs in labmda calculus.
+      It consists of a binder part and a body part.  A lambda abstraction
+      creates a function, that can be applied to an argument. 
+     
+      Note that the body of a lambda abstraction extends all the way to the
+      end of the expression, or the closing bracket surrounding the lambda. In
+      other words, the lambda abstraction \quote{operator} has the lowest
+      priority of all.
+
+      The value of an application is the value of the body part, with the
+      binder bound to the value the entire lambda abstraction is applied to.
+    \stopdesc
+    \startdesc{Non-recursive let expression}
+\startlambda
+let bndr = value in body
+\stoplambda
+      A let expression allows you to bind a binder to some value, while
+      evaluating to some other value (where that binder is in scope). This
+      allows for sharing of subexpressions (you can use a binder twice) and
+      explicit \quote{naming} of arbitrary expressions. Note that the binder
+      is not in scope in the value bound to it, so it's not possible to make
+      recursive definitions with the normal form of the let expression (see
+      the recursive form below).
+
+      Even though this let expression is an extension on the basic lambda
+      calculus, it is easily translated to a lambda abstraction. The let
+      expression above would then become:
+
+\startlambda
+(λbndr.body) value
+\stoplambda
+
+      This notion might be useful for verifying certain properties on
+      transformations, since a lot of verification work has been done on
+      lambda calculus already.
+
+      The value of a let expression is the value of the body part, with the
+      binder bound to the value. 
+    \stopdesc
+    \startdesc{Recursive let expression}
+\startlambda
+let 
+  bndr1 = value1
+  \vdots
+  bndrn = valuen
+in 
+  body
+\stoplambda
+
+      This is the recursive version of the let expression. In \small{GHC}'s
+      Core implementation, non-recursive and recursive lets are not so
+      distinct as we present them here, but this provides a clearer overview.
+      
+      The main difference with the normal let expression is that each of the
+      binders is in scope in each of the values, in addition to the body. This
+      allows for self-recursive definitions or mutually recursive definitions.
+
+      It should also be possible to express a recursive let using normal
+      lambda calculus, if we use the \emph{least fixed-point operator},
+      \lam{Y}.
+    \stopdesc
+    \startdesc{Case expression}
+\startlambda
+  case scrut of bndr
+    DEFAULT -> defaultbody
+    C0 bndr0,0 ... bndr0,m -> body0
+    \vdots
+    Cn bndrn,0 ... bndrn,m -> bodyn
+\stoplambda
+
+TODO: Define WHNF
+
+    A case expression is the only way in Core to choose between values. A case
+    expression evaluates its scrutinee, which should have an algebraic
+    datatype, into weak head normal form (\small{WHNF}) and (optionally) binds
+    it to \lam{bndr}. It then chooses a body depending on the constructor of
+    its scrutinee. If none of the constructors match, the \lam{DEFAULT}
+    alternative is chosen. 
+    
+    Since we can only match the top level constructor, there can be no overlap
+    in the alternatives and thus order of alternatives is not relevant (though
+    the \lam{DEFAULT} alternative must appear first for implementation
+    efficiency).
+    
+    Any arguments to the constructor in the scrutinee are bound to each of the
+    binders after the constructor and are in scope only in the corresponding
+    body.
+
+    To support strictness, the scrutinee is always evaluated into WHNF, even
+    when there is only a \lam{DEFAULT} alternative. This allows a strict
+    function argument to be written like:
+
+\startlambda
+function (case argument of arg
+  DEFAULT -> arg)
+\stoplambda
+
+    This seems to be the only use for the extra binder to which the scrutinee
+    is bound. When not using strictness annotations (which is rather pointless
+    in hardware descriptions), \small{GHC} seems to never generate any code
+    making use of this binder. The current prototype does not handle it
+    either, which probably means that code using it would break.
+
+    Note that these case statements are less powerful than the full Haskell
+    case statements. In particular, they do not support complex patterns like
+    in Haskell. Only the constructor of an expression can be matched, complex
+    patterns are implemented using multiple nested case expressions.
+
+    Case statements are also used for unpacking of algebraic datatypes, even
+    when there is only a single constructor. For examples, to add the elements
+    of a tuple, the following Core is generated:
+
+\startlambda
+sum = λtuple.case tuple of
+  (,) a b -> a + b
+\stoplambda
+  
+    Here, there is only a single alternative (but no \lam{DEFAULT}
+    alternative, since the single alternative is already exhaustive). When
+    it's body is evaluated, the arguments to the tuple constructor \lam{(,)}
+    (\eg, the elements of the tuple) are bound to \lam{a} and \lam{b}.
+  \stopdesc
+  \startdesc{Cast expression}
+\startlambda
+body :: targettype
+\stoplambda
+    A cast expression allows you to change the type of an expression to an
+    equivalent type. Note that this is not meant to do any actual work, like
+    conversion of data from one format to another, or force a complete type
+    change. Instead, it is meant to change between different representations
+    of the same type, \eg switch between types that are provably equal (but
+    look different).
+    
+    In our hardware descriptions, we typically see casts to change between a
+    Haskell newtype and its contained type, since those are effectively
+    different representations of the same type.
+
+    More complex are types that are proven to be equal by the typechecker,
+    but look different at first glance. To ensure that, once the typechecker
+    has proven equality, this information sticks around, explicit casts are
+    added. In our notation we only write the target type, but in reality a
+    cast expressions carries around a \emph{coercion}, which can be seen as a
+    proof of equality. TODO: Example
+
+    The value of a cast is the value of its body, unchanged. The type of this
+    value is equal to the target type, not the type of its body.
+
+    Note that this syntax is also used sometimes to indicate that a particular
+    expression has a particular type, even when no cast expression is
+    involved. This is then purely informational, since the only elements that
+    are explicitely typed in the Core language are the binder references and
+    cast expressions, the types of all other elements are determined at
+    runtime.
+  \stopdesc
+  \startdesc{Note}
+
+    The Core language in \small{GHC} allows adding \emph{notes}, which serve
+    as hints to the inliner or add custom (string) annotations to a core
+    expression. These shouldn't be generated normally, so these are not
+    handled in any way in the prototype.
+  \stopdesc
+  \startdesc{Type}
+\startlambda
+@type
+\stoplambda
+    It is possibly to use a Core type as a Core expression. This is done to
+    allow for type abstractions and applications to be handled as normal
+    lambda abstractions and applications above. This means that a type
+    expression in Core can only ever occur in the argument position of an
+    application, and only if the type of the function that is applied to
+    expects a type as the first argument. This happens for all polymorphic
+    functions, for example, the \lam{fst} function:
+
+\startlambda
+fst :: \forall a. \forall b. (a, b) -> a
+fst = λtup.case tup of (,) a b -> a
+
+fstint :: (Int, Int) -> Int
+fstint = λa.λb.fst @Int @Int a b
+\stoplambda
+    
+    The type of \lam{fst} has two universally quantified type variables. When
+    \lam{fst} is applied in \lam{fstint}, it is first applied to two types.
+    (which are substitued for \lam{a} and \lam{b} in the type of \lam{fst}, so
+    the type of \lam{fst} actual type of arguments and result can be found:
+    \lam{fst @Int @Int :: (Int, Int) -> Int}).
+  \stopdesc
+
+  TODO: Core type system
 
-        Core - description of the language (appendix?)
         Implementation issues
         Simplified core?